Easter Candy Charcuterie Board For An After-Dinner Treat (2024)

Here’s a crowd pleaser of an idea for Easter dinner: an Easter candy “charcuterie board” (platter) at the end of the meal, instead of petit fours*.

Candies and cookies take the place of the meats on an actual charcuterie board†.

We serve ours at the end of the meal, after dessert, with coffee.

You can either create a platter that’s kid-friendly, or a “gourmet” version for the sophisticated foodie crowd, with artisan Easter candies.

You can substitute Easter cookies instead, or combine cookies and candy.

If you’re creating an elegant board for connoisseurs, head to your favorite chocolatiers and augment with petite cookies like mini macarons.

And you can apply the same principles to a Christmas candy or Valentine candy charcuterie board. It’s an all-celebration concept.

And because it’s arranged in advance, you can hide the board from your guests and bring it out as an after-dinner surprise.

Thanks to the International Charcuterie Association for inspiring this article.


CREATE YOUR CANDY CHARCUTERIE BOARD


STEP 1: Select a tray, platter, or cheese board as the base. It doesn’t have to be large; after eating dinner, people’s capacity for candy will be smaller. Trays with a rim are better to contain the candies after people start to dig in.

Provide small paper or plastic cups (muffin/cupcake liners work) and serving spoons for people can help themselves.


STEP 2: Pick Your Treats

Focus on the color palette (as in the photos) to make your board pop.

Check out candies in Easter colors or pastels, or gold or color-foil-wrapped:

  • Candy sticks
  • Chocolate–coated mini pretzels
  • Gum drops
  • Jelly beans
  • M&Ms
  • Marshmallows or Peeps
  • Mini chocolate bunnies (check out the foiled wrapped bunnies from Lindt, photo #4)
  • Mini chocolate/malted eggs
  • Mini cookies
  • Mini PB cups or Reese’s mini PB eggs
  • Sour lemon drops or other sour candy
  • Anything else that looks good

  • Also look for

  • Candy grass (photo #3) to decorate the board and roll into nests to hold jelly beans


  • *FOOD 101: MIGNARDISES (PETIT-FOURS) & FRIANDISES

    These are different types of sweets served at the end of a meal with coffee. Liqueurs can also be served.

    Mignardises (min-yar-DEEZ), from the French for “preciousness,” belong to the group of after-dinner cookies called petit-fours (French for “small baked pastries”).

    Petit-fours (pronounced petty-foor) are tiny cakes or other tiny baked goods, like mini macaroons and other mini cookies. The words are French for “small ovens” but mean “small baked pastries.”

    There are many varieties of petit-four; the most familiar in the U.S. is a one-inch-square layered sponge cake, filled with butter cream and iced in a variety of colored fondants, often with tiny roses or other piped embellishments (photo #6). A truly American addition to a petit-fours plate would be mini cupcakes.

    In France, this style is not common; and there are confections that can be included on a petit-fours plate. See Friandises, below. that are not baked at all.

    There are two styles of petit-fours: glacée (iced) and sec (dry).

  • Petit-fours glacées or frais (fresh) include filled and/or iced petit-fours, miniature babas, miniature éclairs, tiny iced cakes and tartlets.
  • Petit-fours secs (i.e., they don’t have to be eaten fresh like cake) include small cookies, macaroons, madeleines, meringues, palmiers and tuiles.


    Friandises (free-yon-DEEZ), from the French for “delicate,” are another interchangeable term.

    While some people simply include them under the banner of petit-fours, friandises are actually non-baked confections such as glazed or chocolate-dipped fruit, marzipan, small truffles and other chocolates (e.g. bonbons), marzipan, and nut clusters.



    MORE EASTER TREATS

    > The history of Easter candy and the Easter basket.

    > The history of Easter eggs.

    > The history of the Easter ham.


    ________________

    †Charcuterie, a popular first course or board to serve with co*cktails, can include ballotines, confit, galantines, pâtés, sausages, terrines, primarily made from pork. Here’s more about them.




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  • Easter Candy Charcuterie Board For An After-Dinner Treat (1)
    [1] It’s easy to put together an Easter “charcuterie” board, substituting candy for charcuterie (photo © Taste Of Home | TMB Studio).

    Easter Candy Charcuterie Board For An After-Dinner Treat (2)
    [2] A mixture of cookies and candy (photo © Lil Luna—here’s how she made it).

    Easter Candy Charcuterie Board For An After-Dinner Treat (3)
    [3] Candy grass can hold jelly beans or other candy, then eaten (photo © The Typical Mom.

    Easter Candy Charcuterie Board For An After-Dinner Treat (4)
    [4] Gold foil-wrapped mini bunnies add glimmer to the board (photo © Lindt USA).

    Easter Candy Charcuterie Board For An After-Dinner Treat (5)
    [5] A mix of candy and cookies, with an army of chicken and bunny Peeps (photo © Galloway Grazes | Instagram).

    Easter Candy Charcuterie Board For An After-Dinner Treat (6)
    [6] Easter petit-fours (photo © Mackenzie Ltd.).

    Easter Candy Charcuterie Board For An After-Dinner Treat (7)
    [7] Modern mignardises: We have always loved these speckled eggs with candy exteriors and silken ganache insides from artisan chocolatier Fritz Knipschildt | Chocopologie (photo © Williams Sonoma).

    Easter Candy Charcuterie Board For An After-Dinner Treat (2024)

    FAQs

    Easter Candy Charcuterie Board For An After-Dinner Treat? ›

    Dinner after charcuterie can be as simple as warm comforting soup and fresh bread. Soups offer a wide range of ingredient possibilities, allowing you to tailor the flavors to match the theme of your meal.

    What to serve for dinner after a charcuterie board? ›

    Dinner after charcuterie can be as simple as warm comforting soup and fresh bread. Soups offer a wide range of ingredient possibilities, allowing you to tailor the flavors to match the theme of your meal.

    Can you put candy on a charcuterie board? ›

    Choose Your Favorite Candies

    Make sure you choose an assortment of treats so that everyone has something they can choose from on the charcuterie board. You should also make sure that you only choose snack-sized treats. This way, you don't have to worry about having to cut your candy to a smaller size.

    What is the 3-3-3 rule for charcuterie? ›

    No matter the style of the wood charcuterie board, you can always follow the 3-3-3-3 rule. Every charcuterie board should have three meats, three cheeses, three starch options, and three accompaniments, such as fruit, nuts, or veggies.

    What to put on an Easter charcuterie board? ›

    Create your board as usual with your favorite cheese, meats, fruits, nuts, crackers, and jams. Add chocolate-covered bunnies, eggs, and chicks to bring your Easter-themed charcuterie board together.

    Do you eat charcuterie before or after dinner? ›

    Serve your charcuterie board after dinner.

    Per tradition, the so-called 'cheese course' actually followed dinner rather than preceding it.

    Does a charcuterie board count as a meal? ›

    Snacking Dinner Board

    That's this dinner-worthy charcuterie board. You can serve it as a meal for 2-4 people or make a few large platters to put out for Memorial Day party grazing.

    What spreads go with charcuterie? ›

    Dips and jams or preserves will balance out your salty and dry meats and cheeses. Consider offering some fig spread or apricot jam, as they pair divinely with many different charcuterie eats. Stone ground mustard, hummus, and honey are also popular attractions on a charcuterie board.

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